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- Items are listed in approximate chronological order
- Start using the checklist at your current age or level of development, then review preceding items and ensure you've completed all desired items
- Your parents/guardians should help you with this checklist until you are able to read
- Parents/guardians: Also see PARENTS
Right after birth:
FATHER/COACH:
___ Ask if you can cut the umbilical cord
___ Take pictures
Soon after birth:
FATHER/COACH:
___ Call family and friends to advise of health of mother and baby, sex, name, weight, APGAR, etc.
___ Buy things to pass out (tobacco, chocolate or bubble gum cigars, candy bars, peppermint sticks) in appropriate color

PARENTS:
___ Have people wash their hands before touching or holding the baby (for approx. first month)
___ Be aware that the lips and inside of mouth are one of the best indications of a baby's health
___ Discuss following with your pediatrician:
- Baby's health
___ When baby should be seen at pediatrician's office (weight checks, well visits, etc.)
___ Try to put your other children first (let baby wait a few minutes if possible)
___ Fill out and send birth announcements
___ Avoid public places (malls, church, nurseries, etc) for 6-8 weeks
___ Don't use sunscreen with pava until at least 6 months
___ If go to the beach, go early in the day (before the sun gets too hot)
___ Don't use non-hypoallergenic products until at least 2 months
___ Baby carriers (front) - avoid head bouncing fore and aft (sideways is okay)
___ Establish a relationship with your child which ensures he/she knows that you care about him/her, their feelings and their well-being
___ Play with your child
___ Show your child the things you think are important
___ Look your child in the eyes a lot
___ Read to your child, preferably with him/her on your lap, including reading some of the same books over and over, and, reading a variety of things (e.g., menus) - reading a variety of things helps your child understand how things work
___ Expose your child to lots of different types of music
___ Create music with your child
___ Consider choosing a second language to introduce to your child
___ Get a social security number for your child
___ Adjust your income tax withholding form (W-2)
___ On your tax return, take dependent care tax credit, especially if you have lower income
___ Use a flexible spending account to have pre-tax dollars directed from your paycheck to reimburse yourself for child care expenses
Right after getting home:
___ Husband and wife get in bed with baby for awhile, then get some rest
___ Put bathrobe by front door...if anyone comes to the door, put the robe on, answer the door, tell them: "This is the closest I've been to death...I don't know when I'll ever get some sleep."
___ Even if you feel like having visitors soon...don't
Soon after getting home:
___ Call pediatrician for appointments for:
___ Weight check(s)
___ Well visits: 2-3 weeks after birth, 2 mths, 4 mths, 6 mths, 9 mths, etc.
___ Be aware that after having a baby, you'll probably lose some friends (especially those without kids) but you'll gain other friends (especially those with kids)

___ Notify newspapers, newsletters, etc.
___ Adjust life insurance, will, etc.
___ Establish trust fund (or savings account) for infant - to demonstrate the power of saving money
___ Add your new baby as an exemption on your tax return
___ Notify people (e.g., alumni associations) - so they can put it in their publications
___ Notify employer, etc. of new dependent/family member
One week after birth:
___ To pediatrician for weight check
___ Be aware that babies usually lose weight during first week

PARENTS:
Regularly:
___ Ensure your baby gets plenty of stimulation from, and interaction with, other people e.g., touching, sounds (e.g., talking, music), visual, smells (until he/she is several years old) - to stimulate the growth of nerve cells in your baby's brain - stimulation at an early age is much more effective in encouraging learning than at a later age
___ Provide consistent and predictable nuturing, especially during first few years
___ Talk to your baby
___ Massage your baby's body
___ Provide a stable situation for your child, e.g., stable relationships with loving people, especially you - so your baby can develop trust
___ Realize that your baby is especially receptive to learning language during his/her first year
___ Ensure your baby can't reach small objects which might cause choking (until he/she is approx. 3 years old)
___ Provide plenty of guidance
___ Ask local health department if water contains fluoride. If not, check with your doctor...you should probably give your child a fluoride supplement through age 13

If you suspect your baby has a high temperature:
___ Take temperature rectally
When you start rolling over:
PARENTS:
___ Don't leave baby on a bed, sofa, etc. unattended
When you start crawling:
PARENTS:
___ Childproof your house:
___ Put a gate at the top and bottom of all stairs
___ Keep balloons (inflated and uninflated) out of reach
___ See RESIDENCE - CHILDPROOFING
Age 6 months:
___ Get introduced to swimming - so your child won't have a fear of water which will prevent him/her from trying to swim if he/she falls into water
___ Learn to roll onto your back in water and float
Age 9 months:
PARENTS:
___ Be aware that a child can lose consciousness within approx. 2 minutes in water and drown within approx. 6 minutes
Age 1:
Regularly:
___ Play with cups, etc. under running faucet

PARENTS:
___ Be aware that children need to be watched much more closely once they learn to walk
___ Make a game out of learning to read
___ Consider controlling what your child watches on TV by:
___ Deleting certain channels on your TV or VCR (see your owner's manual)
___ Asking your cable TV company to block certain channels
Once your child has learned to walk:
___ Double check your house for hazards to children (see RESIDENCE - CHILDPROOFING)
Age 2:
___ Start reducing fat in diet to same as for adults (no more than 30% of calories from fat)
___ Avoid eating too much:
- Butter/margarine
- Fried food
- Meat
___ Learn:
___ If you get lost (e.g., separated from your parents in a crowd or forest), stay where you are (e.g., hug a tree) and let them find you
___ Don't look directly at the sun except possibly momentarily at sunrise or sunset
___ If someone asks you to go somewhere (e.g., to look for a pet), don't go unless it's okay with your parents
___ If someone (especially if it's a stranger) tries to take you somewhere without your parents' permission, scream (e.g., "you're not my Daddy")
___ Dictate a story to one of your parents and then have them read it back to you

PARENTS:
Regularly (at least daily):
___ Tell your child:
___ You love him/her
___ You're proud of him/her
___ Ask your child:
___ How he/she is doing
___ If they have anything they want to talk about
___ If they have any questions they'd like to ask you
___ What they did that day

APPROACHING BEDTIME
If you notice that your child is getting cranky or irrational, or, starts crying:
___ Start getting them ready for bed

BEDTIME
If you have trouble getting your child to go to sleep:
___ Don't give your child too many choices, e.g.:
- Which book(s) to read
- Bedclothes to wear
___ Don't negotiate with your child, e.g., don't promise to read one more story if your child promises to go right to sleep
___ Establish a routine
___ Consider having your child pick out bed clothes earlier in evening
___ Stimulate your child's imagination while you lull him/her to sleep, e.g.: read or tell a story
Age 3:
___ Start attending preschool - to develop learning skills
___ Consider taking music lessons
___ Consider joining a league (e.g., soccer, T-ball)
___ Learn:
___ That you should always try to do the right thing
___ If you make people play by your rules, they probably won't want to play with you
___ Doctors can't fix everything
___ Importance of crossing street properly
___ To not ask other kids if you can play at their house until your parents ask their parents
___ To say "I would like..." instead of "I want..."
___ To say "please" and "thank you" a lot - a person probably canšt say "please" or "thank you" too much
___ To not invite other kids over to your house until you ask your parents
___ To not put things in your ears
___ To avoid saying "want" and to use "would like" instead
___ That you can't jump off from a high place with an umbrella or blanket, etc (like a parachute) without getting hurt badly
___ To take only what you can eat and to eat what you take
___ How to blow nose
___ To say "yes" instead of "yeah"
___ That there are some bad grown-ups who could try to take you somewhere
___ How to recognize bad grown-ups who could try to take you somewhere
___ How to avoid being taken somewhere by bad grown-ups
___ Agree on a code word that your parents would give to someone if they want them to pick you up
___ Learn to swim
___ Start learning how to cross the street safely
___ Start learning to not eat too much bad food and to eat a variety of good foods in moderation

PARENTS:
___ Give your child a codeword that you would use if you need to have someone your child doesn't know pick him/her up
___ Talk to the other parent about how you should respond when your child asks about sensitive subjects, e.g., sex
___ Ensure your child knows he/she can always come to you if he/she has questions
___ Consider controlling what your child watches on TV:
___ Ask your cable TV company for passwords to use when ordering pay-per-view programming
___ Avoid shows with violence
___ Avoid shows with adult themes (unless an adult is present to explain the situation(s))
___ Avoid shows with commercials
___ Encourage watching educational shows, e.g., on public television
Age 4:
___ Start learning a second language - easier to learn at early age
___ Ask your parents to talk to you about peer pressure
___ Be aware that only 3 out of 4 children achieve night-time dryness by age of 5
___ Learn:
___ Most TV shows do not reflect real life
___ Phone etiquette
___ If you go into a public rest room while your parent waits outside and someone bothers you, to run away and/or scream (e.g., "you're not my Daddy")

PARENTS:
___ Explain to your child that how a person looks is not important, how they treat other people is important
___ Buy books which will help you to talk to your child about sex

As often as feasible:
___ Try to take your child to things he/she can do rather than things he/she would just observe
___ Give your child lots of love and support - so he/she won't seek it from bad friends, gangs, etc.
___ Keep your child busy with interesting and beneficial activities - so he/she won't be tempted by undesirable activities (e.g., trying illegal drugs, vandalism) due to boredom
___ Ensure you are aware of, and understand, what your child is going through, e.g.:
___ Go to the places they go to
___ Listen to the music they listen to
___ Watch the movies they see
___ Volunteer to help in his/her classroom
Age 5:
___ Consider having sealants put on applicable teeth - to help prevent cavities
___ Be aware that only 3 out of 4 children achieve night-time dryness by age of 5
___ Learn:
___ To be kind
___ To be trustworthy
___ To be respectful towards others
___ To be responsibile for your actions
___ To be fair
___ To be caring
___ To be a good citizen (doing your share, obeying the law, etc.)
___ To treat others the way you would like for others to treat you
___ To walk, not ride, your bike across intersections, especially those with traffic lights
___ While riding a bike, to not turn sharply on surface with sand, dirt, water, etc. on it

Regularly:
___ Ask your parents if there are any chores you can do, either just to help out or for money

PARENTS:
___ Encourage your child to ask if there are any chores he/she can do, either just to help out or for money
___ Even if your child has learned to swim, don't leave him/her unsupervised near water, even very shallow water
If you haven't started saving for your child's college education:
___ Invest money in a regular growth fund - less risk than an aggressive growth fund
Age 6:
___ Learn:
___ You shouldn't even try smoking because:
- It kills many people
- It is very hard to quit - it is believed that over 85% of those who try to quit, fail
- It harms and offends other people
- It is very expensive

PARENTS:
___ Ensure your child would feel comfortable telling you if he/she was exposed to (e.g., tried) alcohol, smoking or illegal drugs
___ Check out books, video's, etc. from the library, video store, etc. to help you talk to your child about sex
___ Talk to your child about sex, perhaps using books, video's, etc.
___ Explain to your child what is involved in a good relationship between a man and a woman, e.g.:
___ Communication
___ Respect
___ Mutual interests
Age 7:
___ Be aware that child abductors:
- Most often target boys and girls 10-12 years old - just reaching puberty and anxious to demonstrate their independence from their parents
- Usually target their victims early in the day, then attack between 3-6 p.m.
- Usually use a 2-door sedan - harder for a victim to escape from

PARENTS:
___ Tell your child about the dangers of drugs - tell him/her that you know it's difficult to say "no" to friends who offer you drugs
___ Be aware, and warn your child, that child abductors:
___ Most often target boys and girls 10-12 years old - just reaching puberty and anxious to demonstrate their independence from their parents
___ Usually target their victims early in the day, then attack between 3-6 p.m.
___ Usually use a 2-door sedan - harder for a victim to escape from
___ Talk to your child about the following (perhaps using books, videos, etc. from the library):
- Puberty
- Sex (in general terms, e.g., a man and a woman have to get together to have a baby)
- Reproduction

PARENTS OF A BOY:
___ Explain to your son that erections are normal, even while you're sleeping, and that sometimes there is a discharge ("wet dream")
Age 8:
___ Talk to your parents about why you shouldn't try illegal drugs

PARENTS:
___ Explain that very few people (especially women) look the way they are often portrayed on TV, in magazines, on billboards, etc.
___ Remind your child that it is important to treat others based on how they treat others and not based on their appearance
___ Talk to your child about:
___ Sex in general terms, including:
___ Masturbation (e.g., not unhealthy)
___ AIDS/HIV
___ Venereal diseases
___ Homosexuality

PARENTS OF A GIRL:
___ Talk to your daughter about menstruation
Age 9:
PARENTS:
___ Be aware that girls and boys 10-12 years old are the prime target of child molesters/abducters - because they're just reaching puberty and they tend to be anxious to demonstrate some independence
___ Be aware that children, especially boys, may be reluctant to tell you about someone trying to molest or abduct them because they're afraid you'll restrict their freedom
Age 10:
___ Ask your parents if you can offer to do chores (e.g., mow yards) for money
___ Write and sign a promise to your parents to never try illegal drugs
___ Promise to tell your parents if you ever see, or are offered, illegal drugs
___ Realize that you have reached the age at which you are especially susceptible to the temptation to try illegal drugs

GIRLS
___ Expect your first menstrual period within the next few years (many girls have cramping shortly before their first period)
___ Start carrying sanitary napkins with you

PARENTS
If you haven't started saving for your child's college education:
___ Invest money, e.g., in an equity income fund
Age 11:
___ Review sections for earlier ages to ensure you've completed applicable items
Age 12:
___ Learn CPR (contact American Heart Association, American Red Cross, National Safety Council, etc.)

GIRLS:
___ Delay the start of sexual activity - girls who start sexual activity before age of 18 are more likely to develop cervical cancer from an human papilloma virus (HPV))
Age 13:
___ Review sections for earlier ages to ensure you've completed applicable items

PARENTS:
___ Be aware that approx. 4 of 5 people try smoking cigarettes before they are 18
Age 14:
___ Review sections for earlier ages to ensure you've completed applicable items
Age 15:
PARENTS:
___ Don't put undue pressure on your child to pursue a specific career, e.g., don't try to live vicariously through your child - your child most likely has different talents and interests than you
___ Expose your child to a wide variety of career options, e.g., introduce him/her to people you know in different careers
___ Encourage, but don't control, your child in his/her job search
If you haven't started saving for your child's college education:
___ Invest money, e.g., 25% in equities and 75% in a fixed income fund
Age 16:
___ Review sections for earlier ages to ensure you've completed applicable items
Age 17:
___ Review sections for earlier ages to ensure you've completed applicable items
Age 18:
If you're a male U.S. citizen:
Within 30 days before or after your 18th birthday:
___ Determine if you need to register with the Selective Service (go to http://www.sss.gov/)

___ Register to vote and then vote in elections

PARENTS:
___ Let child move out (if he/she wants to)
Age 21:
___ Review sections for earlier ages to ensure you've completed applicable items
Age 30:
___ Consider taking DHEA (see DHEA)
___ Review the symptoms of a heart attack
Age 35:
MEN:
___ Get a rectal exam - can help detect rectal cancer
___ Consider getting a blood test to check for elevated levels of prostatic-specific antagens

WOMEN:
If you have any of the following risk factors for breast cancer:
- Family history of breast cancer
- Having non-cancerous breast disease
- Prior breast cancer
- Have especially dense breast tissue
- Had first child after you were 30 years old
___ Ask your doctor about getting your first mammogram and getting annual mammograms for the rest of your life (see MAMMOGRAMS)
Age 40:
___ Review the symptoms of a stroke (see STROKES in Checklists to Memorize)

WOMEN:
___ Prepare for menopause (see MENOPAUSE)
___ Ask your doctor about getting your first mammogram and getting annual mammograms for the rest of your life (see MAMMOGRAMS)
After menopause:
WOMEN:
___ Ask your doctor about taking estrogren replacement therapy and/or the herb rosemary - may reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease
Age 50:
___ Be careful to not fall, especially when carrying things - as you get older, it's easier to get hurt and takes much longer to recover from injuries
___ Start eating smaller meals more often during the day - to help burn fat faster
___ Check out 50something.com/)
Age 59:
___ Consider taking funds out of your Individual Retirement Account (IRA)
Age 65:
Regularly:
___ Ask for senior citizen discounts for events, lodging, transportation, meals, etc.
Well before you die:
___ Advise family and friends of your desires in the event that you can only be kept alive by life support systems and there is no hope of recovery
___ Establish a living will to dictate what you would like done in the event you become no longer able to speak for yourself
___ Consider appointing someone to act as your decision maker in the event you become no longer able to speak for yourself
___ Advise members of your family that you want your organs made available for transplanting - your organs can save many lives - if organs become more available, there will be less incentive for countries to execute prisoners to sell their organs
___ Warn relatives, etc. to be wary of strangers' offers right after you die - con artists often check obituaries and contact relatives soon afterwards

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